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Machine Knit Hand Knit Sock With Gusset Heel

machine-knit-hand-knit-sock-with-gusset-heel.jpgI’ve read your comments, really I have.

I’ve debated for a long time whether to sell the pattern, given how much effort it will take to set up and process the step by step photos.

The written portion has been done for quite awhile. I’ve even demonstrated the heel flap and turn at my local machine knitting group several years ago.

The photos (that time thing again) are still in my head rather than in Photoshop ready to publish. Every picture you see on this website represents at least an hour of my life by the time I’m done taking, processing, rejecting, reshooting, and laying out.

I knit and write for the fun of it. For all the hype about monetizing a blog, I’ll be lucky if it earns enough to pay my hosting fees. And frankly, I really don’t want the hassle of being obliged to answer questions for a purchased pattern. I have no real feel for how well MKHK would do financially to compensate me for the support that a buyer should expect. Unfortunately, machine knitting isn’t a growth industry.

For now, I’ve decided to post my demo sock pattern. It is copyrighted, but free for you to knit. I haven’t ruled out adding pictures later. I just don’t want you to wait any longer. It is worth more to me to have my name associated with the pattern and technique than to bean count what the effort might bring.

Once you have mastered the heel turn instructions, you should be able to make a sock to fit your foot, using your standard hand knitting pattern that fits as a guide. You would simply need to make gauge adjustments.

As you read the pattern, keep in mind I came to machine knitting from a hand knitting perspective, and draw on that experience to make this sock.

I recommend you read the entire pattern before you begin knitting. I’ve tried to keep a logical structure of explaining the hand knit process, then general machine knit translation, then provide specific instructions for the sample sock within each section.

Introduction

I love hand knit socks. They look wonderful and fit beautifully. However, it takes me forever to finish a pair by hand. And don’t even get me started on what happens when after a week of hand knitting a fancy cable leg it ends up being too tight…..

For the longest time I assumed you couldn’t make hand knit like socks on the knitting machine. All the patterns I could find either used short rows or hold position to shape the heel. Short rows left holes and slid down my foot. Hold position shaped heels were usually lumpy with a ridge because there were no slipped stitches to ease the transition.

You can make a hand knit sock on the machine. It requires a ribber and a machine capable of slipping stitches in both directions and knitting circular. You do not need a punch card or electronic machine. A common EON pusher with a flat ruler on the other side is also very useful, but not essential.

You will rehang the sock after the heel turn. Don’t panic – it is not as overwhelming as it may sound. I have a few tips to help you out. Remember, when it is finished you will have a beautiful hand knit like sock.

If you are comfortable hand knitting, you can make a literal translation of a hand knit sock without ever cutting the yarn. You hand knit a circular cuff of your choosing, hang it on the knitting machine, knit circular for the rest of the leg, and then follow the directions for the remainder of the sample sock.

If seaming the leg is acceptable to you, your design opportunities open immensely, especially if you have a punch card or electronic machine. The heel, heel turn, foot, and toe can still be identical to a typical hand knit sock. However instead of the couple of weeks it takes me to knit by hand, I can finish a pair of socks in a few hours.

Let’s get started!

Sizing

Measure around the ball of your foot at its widest point. I subtract 10% so my socks won’t be loose and sloppy when worn. My foot circumference is 8.875”. I make my socks 8” around. I have an average size leg so I use this measurement for the leg as well as the foot portion of my socks.

* For this sample, I used my Brother Bulky 260 with matching ribber and a circular gauge of 5 stitches to the inch and 7 rows to the inch. If you have a standard gauge machine, simple follow the same directions and make a child size sock. Once you have made the sample, you can probably double the number of stitches for a good starting point for an adult sock.

To make your life easy, don’t get bogged down in gauge and “will it fit?” Simply go through the process so you know how a gusseted heel is constructed on a knitting machine. You can make one that fits later.

Sample Sock Circumference
[8.875” foot circumference – 10%] x 5 stitches per inch = 40 stitches cast on (add 2 seam stitches if knitting leg flat)

Sample Sock Length
Stand on a sheet of paper and draw a line at your heel and a line at your toe. Subtract 1.75 inches for the heel flap and another 2 inches for the starting point of the toe decreases. My foot is 9.75” long. I knit 6” after the heel flap, including the gusset decrease rows.

9.75” total foot length – 1.75” heel flap – 2” toe = 6 inches

Multiply this adjusted foot length by your row gauge and then by 2 since it takes two rows of knitting to equal one round. The answer is the number of rows you will knit from the point of hanging the sock for the gusset decreases to the beginning of the toe decreases.

Gauge

It is very important to take the time to make circular gauge swatches. You need your machine and ribber to have matching row and stitch gauges. On Japanese flat bed machines such as Studio, Singer, and Brother, you frequently need different tension number settings on each bed to knit a smooth fabric. I have to set my Brother bulky main bed one full tension number lower than the ribber to get matching rows per inch. On my Brother standard gauge machine, I have to do the opposite. My main bed tension is set one full number higher than the ribber. I’m not sure why the difference, I just give it what it wants.

I usually don’t bother with flat gauge tension swatches. I use my circular gauge swatch. The leg is the only large area I might knit flat and if my leg is ½” longer or shorter than I expected, it is no big deal to me. As long as the two socks match, I’m happy.

When hand knitting a cuff in the round, match the stitch per inch gauge to the machine. Don’t bother trying to match the row gauge. Knitting machines typically knit more rows for a given stitch gauge than a hand knitter can achieve. You will become very frustrated trying to match both. Stitches per inch is all that matters when combining hand and machine knitting to make a sock.

Sample Sock
Circular gauge swatch is 5 spi (stitches per inch) and 7 rpi (rows per inch)
T 1.2/2.2
Brother Bulky machine

Leg

When I machine knit a ribbed leg, I would calculate 7 rpi x 7 inches total leg length = 49 rows on row counter.

If I were knitting a stockinette leg circular, I would have to double the row count since knitting rounds.

Sample Sock
CO 42 stitches and arrange in k2p2 ribbing. Make sure the ribbing starts and ends with two stitches on the main (back) bed. This will allow for nice seaming.

Rib for seven inches (7 x 7 rpi = 49 rows)
For Right foot sock with seam on inside of foot, end with COL
For Left foot sock with seam on inside of foot, add one row and end with COR
Transfer ribber stitches to main bed
Decrease one stitch on each end of sock. This removes the leg seam stitch.

Heel Flap

I love the heel flaps of traditional hand knit socks. They fit my foot perfectly, without the usual stress points, slippage, or holes of a short row heel. Plus they look great and offer numerous design opportunities since knitted flat.

In hand knitting, the heel flap is knit back in forth on half of the total number of sock leg stitches. The other half of stitches is held on a spare needle for when it is time to knit the instep.

Hand Knit Heel Flap

Row 1: *slip 1, k1*, repeat from * to *
Row 2: slip 1, p to end

Repeat rows one and two until the number of rows equals the number of stitches in the heel flap. The slipped stitches will form a chain selvedge on each side of the heel flap. You should be able to count one chain stitch for every two rows of the heel flap.

Machine Knit Heel Flap

In a hand knit pattern, you begin on the front side of the sock. This is usually the knit side of the fabric. For machine knitters, this means your carriage is on the left since we look at the purl side of the fabric.

* Remember, I’m using a Brother Bulky and my slip directions reflect this machine. The heel flap is done by hand manipulation, you do not need to use a punch card. You will have to be familiar with how your machine slips stitches and translate accordingly.

COL
RC000
Push in both part buttons for slipping left and right
Find an EON pusher with one notched side and one flat side

Machine Knit Heel Flap For Right Foot If Leg Is Seamed
Leg section ended with COL
Scrap off onto WY the right most half of leg sts. An even number of sts remains in work
Return carriage to left side
Even number of stitches
Set carriage to slip in both directions. On Brother machines, push in both part buttons

Starting on side of carriage, move to D position by hand with the EON pusher all stitches to be knitted. Needles left in B position will be slipped.

Row 1: *slip 1 by leaving st in B pos, k1 by moving needle to D pos*, repeat from * to *
Knit across row, ending with COR

Row 2: slip 1 by leaving st in B position, k to end by moving remaining needles to D position. Knit across row, ending with COL

Repeat rows one and two until the number of rows equals the number of stitches in the heel flap. The slipped stitches will form a chain selvedge on each side of the heel flap. You should be able to count one chain stitch for every two rows of the heel flap.

Machine Knit Heel Flap For Left Foot If Leg Is Seamed
Leg section needs to end with COR. This is one more row than Right Foot sock
Scrap off onto WY the left most half of leg stitches. An even number of stitches remains in work. Leave carriage on left
Unknit heel flap stitches by hand back to the left
Place yarn in carriage
Set carriage to slip in both directions. On Brother machines, push in both part buttons

Starting on side of carriage, move to D position by hand with the EON pusher all stitches to be knitted. Needles left in B position will be slipped.

Row 1: *slip 1 by leaving stitch in B pos, k1 by moving needle to D pos*, repeat from * to *
Knit across row, ending with COR

Row 2: slip 1 by leaving stitch in B position, k to end by moving remaining needles to D position. Knit across row, ending with COL

Repeat rows one and two until the number of rows equals the number of stitches in the heel flap. The slipped stitches will form a chain selvedge on each side of the heel flap. You should be able to count one chain stitch for every two rows of the heel flap.

Sample Sock Heel Flap

Knit heel flap on 20 stitches (1/2 of CO, do not include seam stitches)
COL
RC000
Push in both part buttons for slipping left and right
Find EON pusher with one notched side and one flat side

Row 1: *slip 1 by leaving stitch in B pos, k1 by moving needle to D pos by hand or with EON pusher*, repeat from * to *
Knit across row, ending with COR

Row 2: slip 1 by leaving stitch in B position, k to end by moving remaining needles to D position. Knit across row, ending with COL

Repeat these two rounds until RC020, the number of stitches in heel flap. You should be able to count one chain stitch for every two rows of the heel flap.

Heel Turn

The heel turn begins with some basic math to insure the heel is centered and evenly decreased on both sides. The typical heel turn used in many patterns is the Round Heel. Since many of you have hand knit this heel flap, I’m including the instructions for reference so the machine directions make more sense.

Hand Knit Round Heel Turn
If the total number of heel flap stitches are divisible by 4, then the first row of the heel turn is to knit ½ of the heel flap stitches plus 1, K2tog, K1, turn. The second row is: sl 1, p3, p2tog, p1, turn. Both sides should have the same number of stitches not in work and the number should be even.

If the heel flap stitches are divisible by 2, but not 4, then the first row of the heel turn is to knit ½ of the heel flap stitches plus 2, k2tog, k1 turn. The second row is: sl 1, p5, p2tog, p1, turn. Both sides should have the same number of stitches not in work and the number should be even.

After the first two rows, the pattern will say:

Row 3: slip 1, k to 1st stitch before gap, k2tog, k1, turn
Row 4: slip 1, p to 1st stitch before gap, p2tog, p1, turn

Repeat rows 3 and 4 until all heel flap stitches are used up

The gap is the space between the slipped stitch of the previous row and its adjacent stitch not in work.

The row-by-row hand knitting directions for the heel turn of our sample sock knit with 20 heel flap stitches are as follows:

Row 1: k ½ of heel flap stitches (10) plus 1, k2tog, k1, turn (6 stitches remain)
Row 2: slip 1, p3, p2tog, p1, turn (6 stitches remain)

Row 3: slip 1, k4, k2tog, k1, turn (4 stitches remain)
Row 4: slip 1, p5, p2tog, p1, turn (4 stitches remain)

Row 5: slip 1, k6, k2tog, k1, turn (2 stitches remain)
Row 6: slip 1, p7, p2tog, p1, turn (2 stitches remain)

Row 7: slip 1, k8, k2tog, k1, turn (0 stitches remain)
Row 8: slip 1, p9, p2tog, p1, turn (0 stitches remain)

12 stitches remain

Machine Knit Round Heel Turn
RC000
COL because the hand knitting directions start from the knit side
Push in both part buttons. This will cause needles in D position to knit and needles in B position to slip in both directions.

Use the same math formula as for the hand knit round heel turn.

If the total number of heel flap stitches is divisible by 4, then the first row of the heel turn is to knit ½ of the heel flap stitches plus 1, k2tog, k1, leave the remaining stitches in slip position. The second row is: slip 1, k3, k2tog, k1, leave the remaining stitches in slip position. Both sides should have the same number of stitches not in work and the number should be even.

If the total number of heel flap stitches is divisible by 2, but not 4, then the first row of the heel turn is to knit ½ of the heel flap stitches plus 2, k2tog, k1, leave the remaining stitches in slip position. The second row is: slip 1, k5, k2tog, k1, leave the remaining stitches in slip position. Both sides should have the same number of stitches not in work and the number should be even.

Sample Sock Heel Turn
Our sample sock has 20 heel stitches. Since the heel flap is divisible by 4, the heel turn begins by knitting ½ of the total heel flap stitches plus one extra before making the first k2tog decrease. This insures that the heel turn is centered and an equal number of stitches remain in B position to be slipped with each two rows. This math is the same regardless if the socks are knit by hand or by machine.

To form the k2tog, place the stitch furthest from the carriage on top of the stitch closest to the carriage.

Row 1: On carriage side, k ½ of heel flap stitches (10) plus 1, k2tog, k1, by moving these needles to D position so they will knit. 6 stitches remain in B position OC to slip. Knit across row.

Row 2: On carriage side, slip 1 by leaving it in B position. k3, k2tog, k1, by moving these needles to D position so they will knit. 6 stitches remain in B position OC to slip. Knit across row.

Row 3: On carriage side, slip the last stitch knit by leaving it in B position. k4, k2tog, k1, by moving these needles to D position so they will knit. 4 stitches remain in B position OC to slip. Knit across row

Row 4: On carriage side, slip the last stitch knit by leaving it in B position. k5, k2tog, k1, by moving these needles to D position so they will knit. 4 stitches remain in B position OC to slip. Knit across row.

Row 5: On carriage side, slip the last stitch knit by leaving it in B position. k6, k2tog, k1, by moving these needles to D position so they will knit. 2 stitches remain in B position OC to slip. Knit across row.

Row 6: On carriage side, slip the last stitch knit by leaving it in B position. k7, k2tog, k1, by moving these needles to D position so they will knit. 2 stitches remain in B position OC to slip. Knit across row.

Row 7: On carriage side, slip the last stitch knit by leaving it in B position. k8, k2tog, k1, by moving these needles to D position so they will knit. 0 stitches remain in B position OC to slip. Knit across row.

Row 8: On carriage side, slip the last stitch knit by leaving it in B position. k9, k2tog, k1, by moving these needles to D position so they will knit. 0 stitches remain in B position OC to slip. Knit across row.

Knit back to right one more row ending with COR. 12 stitches remain. Remove on waste yarn so sock can be hung for gusset decreases. DO NOT cut main color yarn.

These directions produce an identical heel turn to the row-by-row directions for the hand knit heel turn. If you look close, you can see the gap on the knitting machine before you close it with each k2tog.

Gusset

Hand Knit Gusset
In hand knitting, the gusset round begins at the center heel.

Round 1: knit across half of the heel turn stitches, pick up one stitch through each slip stitch on side of the heel flap, knit across the instep stitches, pick up one stitch through each slip stitch on other side of heel flap and finally, knit the remaining stitches in the heel turn, ending back at the center of the heel turn. This completes the first round.

Round 2: continue knitting in a circle as in round one. When you reach the third st from the end of the heel flap before the instep, k2tog (a right leaning decrease), k1. Knit across all instep stitches. At the start of the other side of the heel flap, k1, ssk (a left leaning decrease), knit the rest of the picked up stitches. Knit the remaining stitches in the heel turn, ending back at the center of the heel turn. This completes the second round.

Round 3: knit with no decreases.

Repeat rounds 2 and 3 until all gusset stitches have been decreased and the total number of stitches remaining is equal to your CO number of stitches.

Machine Knit Gusset
Set carriage for circular knitting
RC000
COR at center heel position

No doubt, this is the hardest, most stressful part of the pattern for me. You are going to rehang the sock and pull needles through the side slipped stitches of the heel flap, just as you would with its hand knit cousin.

Make sure all live stitches are held by waste yarn so nothing drops and runs as you rehang the sock. Make sure the main yarn is not trapped on the outside of the sock by the waste yarn. If it is, cut a channel for the main yarn to return to the inside of the sock.

Hand knit sock rounds begin at the center of the heel. We will hang our sock so that the center heel is on the right.

Do not be alarmed if the yarn is not at the center heel but at the end of the heel. After the sock is hung, you will unknit back by hand to the right for the start of the gusset decrease. If the yarn is at the other side of the heel, hand knit the needles forward so yarn can be placed in the carriage at the right.

Hang all instep stitches starting at needle 1 left of center and moving to the left. Half will be on MB and half will be on RB.

Hang all gusset pick up stitches starting at needle 1 right of center. One side of heel flap will be on Main Bed and other side of heel flap will be on Ribber Bed.

Hang the Heel Turn stitches such that the center of heel is half on MB and half on RB. Unknit yarn back to right, being careful not to drop stitches, and place yarn in carriage.

Round 1: RC000. Knit, ending with carriage at the right (center heel). Gently tug on stitches if necessary to ensure they are well seated in latch hooks.

Round 2: RC002 Decrease one stitch each bed by moving to the left all stitches right of needle R2, doubling up on needle R2. You will do this on both the MB and RB. Two stitches are decreased. Move the two new empty needles to non-working position. Knit one round ending with COR. Gently tug on sts if necessary to ensure they are well seated in latch hooks, especially the two needles with the decreased stitches.

Round 3: RC004 Knit, ending with carriage at the right (center heel). Gently tug on stitches if necessary to ensure they are well seated in latch hooks,

RC006
Repeat rounds 2 and 3, always doubling up on needle Right of Center 2 on both beds until the number of stitches remaining is what is needed for the foot. In hand knitting patterns, this number equals the number of stitches used in the leg. For our example, 40 stitches: 20 on MB and on 20 RB

Gusset decreases are now finished. DO NOT RESET Row counter.

Sample Sock Gusset
40 stitch sock with six extra stitches on both beds to decrease
Hang half of instep stitches on main bed left of center, MB needles L1-L10
Hang half of instep stitches on ribber bed left of center, RB needles L1-L10
Hang chain selvedge stitches on main bed right of center, MB needles R1-R10
Hang chain selvedge stitches on ribber bed right of center, RB needles R1-R10
Hang half of heel stitches on main bed right of center, MB needles R11-R16
Hang half of heel stitches on ribber bed right of center, RB needles R11-R16

You do not have to hang the stitches in this order, just in these precise locations. It makes keeping track of the gusset decreases much easier. I usually hang the stitches that go on L1 and R1 on both beds first for reference and then work in both directions until all are hung. I will frequently use a ribber hanger down the center of the sock to keep what I have hung from popping off. (see pictures)

Round 1: RC000. Knit, ending with carriage at the right (center heel). Gently tug on stitches if necessary to ensure they are well seated in latch hooks.

Round 2: RC002 Decrease one stitch each bed by moving to the left all stitches right of needle R2, doubling up on needle R2. You will do this on both the MB and RB. Two stitches are decreased. Move the two new empty needles to non-working position. Knit one round ending with COR. Gently tug on stitches if necessary to ensure they are well seated in latch hooks, especially the two needles with the decreased stitches.

Round 3: RC004 Knit, ending with carriage at the right (center heel). Gently tug on stitches if necessary to ensure they are well seated in latch hooks,

RC006
Repeat rounds 2 and 3, always doubling up on needle R2 on both beds until the number of stitches remaining is what is needed for the foot. In hand knitting patterns, this number equals the number of stitches used in the leg. For our example, 40 stitches: 20 on MB and on 20 RB

Gusset decreases are now finished. DO NOT RESET row counter.

Foot

Hand Knit
Knit in the round until sock is 2” from desired length.

Machine Knit

Continue knitting circular until row counter indicates it is time to start toe decreases. This number was calculated earlier in the Size section. The distance is measured from the edge of the heel flap.

Sample Sock
6” adjusted foot length x 7 rows per inch x 2 rows per round = 84 rows to knit before beginning toe decreases

Toe

Hand Knit
Round 1: knit to 3rd stitch from end of needle one, k2tog k1. Starting on needle two, k1, ssk, knit to 3rd stitch from end, k2tog, k1. On needle three, k1, ssk, knit to end.

Round 2: knit

Repeat rounds 1 and 2 until ½ of CO stitches remain. Then repeat round 1 by itself until 8 stitches remain. Graft remaining stitches with Kitchener stitch.

Machine Knit Toe #1
If you leave the sock on the knitting machine, the toe decreases will be made towards the center 4 stitches on both beds since the sock is hanging sideways. Your finished kitchener toe will look like this, having a band form all the way around the toe. You will also have any ladder formed by the change from ribber to main bed running down the top and bottom of the sock. If your row gauge matches on the two beds, this shouldn’t be too noticeable.

Machine Knit Toe #2

If you remove the sock on waste yarn and rehang it so the foot in on the RB and the instep is on the MB, your finished kitchener toe will look like this. The toe decreases will be made on each outside edge of each bed. Any ladder formed by the change from RB to MB will run down the sides of the sock. After rehanging, you will have to unknit half a row back to the carriage.

Machine Knit Toe #3

Take sock off on WY and rehang so instep is on MB and foot/sole is on RB.

Take off 3rd st from end on each side of both beds, move outer two sts over one position. Return 3rd st to top of st 2. Knit two rounds. When the toe is finished, this will create a 4 st wide toe band on both sides of foot. It will look like this. If you simply do a normal full fashioned decrease, your toe will look like this. Each is fine, but do have very different finished appearances.

Abbreviations

MKHK Machine Knit Hand Knit
COL Carriage on Left
COR Carriage on Right
EON Every Other Needle
MB Main Bed
RB Ribber Bed
St Stitch
Sts Stitches
WY Waste Yarn
R Right
L Left
Spi Stitches per inch
Rpi Rows per inch
CO Cast on

Favorite Tools

Long thin metal claw hangers with hole for added weight
Studio 155 short weighted bar
Small claw weight
EON/Ruler for slipping heel flap in a jiffy

Tips

Leg
If the leg was knit circularly, WY the heel flap side separately from the instep side. Otherwise, the main yarn will be trapped on the outside of the leg when the sock is rehung for the heel flap. A long loop could form causing a sloppy stitch because the yarn would have to travel over the waste yarn to get to its first needle.

If leg is knit flat, the seam should be on the inside leg. This means you will knit a “left” and “right” leg, so both seams face inside. When the heel flap is on the right as viewed by the knitter from the purl side of the fabric, the seam will be on the inside for the left sock. When the heel flap is on the left, the sock is for the right foot.

Picot cuffs can be too thick to rehang easily. Make sure to knit at least 3 rows by hand after closing the cuff with the k2 togethers. Drop the narrow claw hangers down the inside of the tube and hang weights at the end as needed. Make sure claws are only in fabric and not on metal lip of ribber bed. You will be able to tell because sts will not be pulled down and will appear loose in needles.

To coax sts down, either use a metal pusher or drop the ribber down one notch on one side and use your fingers to gently push st down. Put ribber back up, knit one round, re push sts. This will continue until thickness of cuff is past the narrow opening where the two knitting beds meet.

Always think about the seam when deciding on layout of stitches. With K2P2 ribbing, make sure both sides have two sts on MB. With K1P1 ribbing, make sure one side has one stitch on MB and the other side has two sts on MB

Heel turn
Decreases are made by moving the outer most st furthest from the center of the needle bed, and placing it on top of the st closet to the carriage.

*Remember, the Purl references below are for those familiar with hand knitting socks. You will not be reforming stitches on the knitting machine. “Purl” stitches occur in flat knitting when COR and moves to the left and “Knit” stitches occur when COL and is moved to the right. As a machine knitter, all we see is the purl side of the fabric. A hand knitter sees the knit side. To make our directions mess with those of hand knitting patterns, we must begin with COL

“Purl” rows begin with COR and “Knit” rows begin with COL

Other Heel flap options
Heel flap for sock knit circular:
End leg with COR. Drop ribber bed. Put in WY and MB carriage. Scrap off MB stitches onto WY. Using garter bar, remove all RB stitches. Turn and rehang on MB. Main yarn will now be at the left. You are ready to begin heel flap

A second option is to start at row 2 of heel flap and have one less row as compared to other sock

A third option is to flip flop the heel flap rows, beginning with the purl row and ending with knit/slip row

COL (knit side or right side in hand knitting)
Even number of sts
Set carriage to slip in both directions. On Brother machines, push in both part buttons
Starting with needle by carriage, move to D position by hand with the EON pusher all sts to be knitted. Needles left in B position will be slipped.

Row 1: *Sl 1 by leaving st in B pos, k1 by moving needle to D pos*, repeat from * to *
K across row, ending with COR

Row 2: Sl 1 by leaving st in B position, k to end by moving remaining needles to D position. Knit across row, ending with COL

Repeat these two rounds until RC equals the number of stitches in heel flap

Heel flap
Hang the Studio 155 bar weight across all heel flap sts and move up every 4 to 5 rows.

Make sure last needle furthest from carriage is in D position to knit on row 1 and all odd number rows. If it is a slip st, check to make sure you have an even number of heel flap sts.

Gusset
If stitches are sproingy because of thick fabric trying to squeeze through the two knitting beds, use the thin metal hanger as a pusher and gently nudge stitches down after each round knitted. This will help the next round of stitches knit off the needles. After a few rounds, the fabric will begin to cooperate and knit off better. The gusset decreases is the most challenging part of this sock pattern.

When transferring stitches to the left for the gusset decreases, hold the sock from under the machine so they stay in the needle latches easier. This is especially important when moving the ribber stitches, pulling up on them can cause the main bed stitches to pop off.

After decreasing, double check that stitches are secure in their latches by first pushing all needles gently back to B position and checking to see all sts are accounted for and then gently pulling down on the sock to set the sts in the latches. Make sure the two new empty needles are returned to non working position before knitting the new round.

When pulling down on sock from underneath the machine, beware of the ribber bolts that lurk underneath. Push away from the bolts as you are pulling down on the fabric.

Sizing
For sock length, stand on a sheet of paper and draw a line at your heel and a line at your toe. Subtract 1.75 inches for the heel flap and another 1.75 inches for the starting point of the toe decreases. The toe decrease section is actually closer to 2 inches long. However, I have always needed to add back approximately ¼ inch for the final length of fabric that must curl down over the top of my toe to meet the foot. If I don’t, my toes feel cramped.
(9.75” total foot length – 1.75” heel flap – 1.75” toe = 6.25 inches)

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July 29, 2009

9 comments

1 Walking Socks { 09.21.09 at 6:11 am }

Simply astonishing that you have the patience to do this, but then again i bet you could fashion the perfect sock to fit perfectly, truly fantastic article.

2 Catherine Macdonald { 11.13.09 at 1:45 am }

Hello – I don’t yet have a website. Hope to soon.

I’ve been hand knitting small socks for four different little girls and just about reached the point where it is my turn.

I usually get problems solved by rolling them around in my head for a while and then putting the possible result or solution to the test in “real time”.

I was rolling the notion of how I might make the socks on my PASSAP 6000 when I happened on your sock, while searching for something entirely different. It is a beautiful sock!

My thought was to knit the rib flat, then do the leg circular, hand knit the heel and turn it, and then put it back on the machine – the only thing is that knitting the gusset shaping on the PASSAP could be a bit chancy because you can’t see the stitches between the beds with this machine. And there is the tension problem if the gusset is done by hand.

I figured knitting the leg and the foot circular is no problem, and the toe can be hand knit… Right now I’m still at figuring out the options for the gusset.

Seeing your sock is very encouraging. I’ll have to translate (first understand) your directions for the whole job to make it work on the PASSAP – but if it can be done on the Brother, it can be done on the other.

Thank you for making this available. It will be fun – and a challenge to try to do this.

I live in Canada We’re at opposite ends of the world and it is a pleasure to find this knitting place!

Warm regards,
Catherine.

3 Kathryn { 11.13.09 at 8:08 am }

I have made the sock on a Passap. The problem isn’t the double beds, but the inability to put needles into hold to insure they knit off correctly.

I had lots of problems with dropped stitches that I didn’t find until the sock was “finished”, or so I thought. If you have a set of Pinkie edge springs, they can help because they have their springs on opposite sides. When decreasing for the toe, you can move them in really close to make sure all the stitches knit off when they are suppose to.

4 Cobi Lee Henry { 01.29.10 at 5:24 pm }

Want to try this. Do you think you would ever do this on a DVD? would but it if you did! Dyslexics like myself can get hung up on the written instructions. Hugs, The socks are beautiful, and so far just been hand knitting 2 at a time on circ’s of my own pattern design after viewing several that “almost had what I wanted”, came up with my own method. Would really like to get a great machine knit pattern. …now
just have to take this step by step. Will let you know how it goes… Hugs, Cobi

5 T. Gwathmey { 08.27.10 at 7:58 am }

You can do this COBI!!

Tm

6 Janet { 01.23.11 at 9:55 am }

Hello, I just happened on this sock pattern looking for machine knit socks patterns.
It is absolutely beautiful !
It looks like this one was done on a standard Machine ???
I have a Brother Bulky and a Brother standard.
I only have a ribber for the standard. I am NOT an accomplished knitter….but I am learning and Love to try things. This patterns looks involved .
I haven’t done several of these skills.

Any chance you are still thinking about doing this on a DVD ?
Or even some of it…..when I have a bit of tutoring I do so much better.
Thank you for this pattern. I admire your patience to be able to actually construct your own pattern and technique with a terrific result.

Janet

7 carole struthers { 01.31.11 at 7:13 pm }

I’ve tried twice now to print out your hand knit sock with gusset heel and it only prints out pages 7 thru 10 then spits out a bunch of empty paper and then prints the first page. Please help. I’m needing a very basic sock pattern that I can do on 2 circuoars and this one oooked like one I could try. Please send it to me by email so I can try to get it all together. Thanks, Carole in Oregon

8 Jane { 05.22.11 at 1:25 pm }

Thanks so much for posting the pattern. I did production knitting of socks on a Passap for years. Advice: use plenty of of extra claw weights when turning heels.

Copyrighting pattern? Not much point in it. I used to be a designer at a large Woolen Mill. When a good design came out, all we had to do was to change one stitch. Better to have your name know as a designer.

9 Marie Hornbein(new comment) { 03.18.13 at 4:34 pm }

I love your sock pattern plus your directions are, well, awesome. I’m working on knitting the sample sock on my Brothers bulky. I’ve finished the ribbing, the heel flap and turning the heel. Now it’s time to rehang the sock and start the gusset decreases which your describe as the hardest, most stressful part. I’m reading and rereading your directions. I’m having a hard time understanding how to do this. If you could add a photo of this step to your directions, I think that it would be helpful.
Another thought, could the gusset be hand-knit and then the sock rehung to finish it?

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